Our Corporate State

In this update: 1. Vote on AT&T cable bill set for tomorrow 2. Dropping the F bomb for the sake of democracy 3. Ryan headed to prison. Why not Jensen? 4. New ethics cops go back to the future Our Corporate State

Email date: 11/7/07

In this update:
1. Vote on AT&T cable bill set for tomorrow
2. Dropping the F bomb for the sake of democracy
3. Ryan headed to prison. Why not Jensen?
4. New ethics cops go back to the future

AT&T’s cable TV bill is scheduled for a vote in the state Senate tomorrow. What this says about our state Legislature is the subject of a commentary by the Democracy Campaign’s director. Blogger Paul Soglin takes aim at what it says about the Senate Democrats.

Governor Jim Doyle seems to like the cable legislation. No wonder. He’s the leading recipient of campaign donations from AT&T among current state office holders, having raked in $79,800 from the company’s political action committee and employees.

To contact your senator by e-mail, go here. You also can call the toll-free Legislative Hotline at 800-362-9472 (266-9960 in Madison). To contact the governor, go here or call 608-266-1212.

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Our latest Big Money Blog is about how important it is in a democracy to know the F word.

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Former Illinois Governor George Ryan is headed to federal prison even before all of his appeals of his conviction on corruption charges are exhausted. Ryan asked to remain free on bail until the U.S. Supreme Court decides whether to hear his appeal. His request was rejected. Which begs the question.... If Ryan cannot remain free until every last appeal is heard, why is Scott Jensen allowed to? It’s been more than 600 days since the former speaker of Wisconsin’s State Assembly was convicted of three felonies and he’s still free pending completion of the appeal process.

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The new Government Accountability Board created by the ethics reform bill passed in January announced its pick for chief of staff on Monday, and went back to the past to find someone who will lead the fledgling agency into the future.