Supreme Court Race Gets Costlier and Uglier

In this update: 1. Money flows as high court race slides into gutter 2. Freshmen lawmakers propose Supreme Court campaign fix 3. Troha scandal takes yet another turn 4. The mystery of the vanishing law Supreme Court Race Gets Costlier and Uglier

Email date: 3/23/07

In this update:
1. Money flows as high court race slides into gutter
2. Freshmen lawmakers propose Supreme Court campaign fix
3. Troha scandal takes yet another turn
4. The mystery of the vanishing law

The last state campaign finance reports before the April 3 election are due Monday. The filings will cover fundraising and campaign spending from February 6 through March 19. They will very likely show that with two weeks worth of campaigning still to be reported after the election the two candidates for state Supreme Court already have broken the previous record for fundraising in a high court race.

Both candidates have said they each expect to raise and spend at least $1 million. The old record was set back in 1999 when both candidates combined raised and spent just over $1.3 million.

On top of what the candidates are spending on their campaigns, the Democracy Campaign estimates that the cost of electioneering by special interest groups already has topped the $1.7 million mark in the Supreme Court race. Much more will be spent before April 3 as new interest group ads are just now hitting the airwaves.

Please help the Democracy Campaign monitor how special interests are seeking to commandeer this race by using our Hijack Hotline to let us know what you see, hear or receive in the mail from interest groups.

To catch up on some of the latest developments in what surely will be remembered as not only the most costly Supreme Court race in state history but also the nastiest and most partisan, go here, here, here and here (click on the camera icon in the upper right hand corner of the story to view the video).

______________________________________________________________

Two freshmen state legislators recently announced plans to introduce legislation to clean up the financing of Supreme Court elections. The sorry spectacle of this year’s race for Wisconsin’s highest court is making a very strong case for immediate consideration and prompt passage of this reform.

______________________________________________________________

In our last E-Lert we noted that the scandal involving Kenosha casino developer Dennis Troha had spread from the governor and his administration to Congress. Now it is reaching all the way to the White House.

______________________________________________________________

It’s not easy for a bill to become law. But one little reform bill successfully made the arduous journey, only to find that a law can be unmade a lot more quickly and easily than it’s made. To find out what we mean, check out our latest Big Money Blog.