How a Bill Really Becomes a Law

In this update: 1. Animated short film ’Statehouse Crock’ makes its debut 2. UPDATE: More details nailed down for March 13 citizen rally 3. Moneybags and mouthpieces How a Bill Really Becomes a Law

Email date: 3/4/08

In this update:
1. Animated short film ’Statehouse Crock’ makes its debut
2. UPDATE: More details nailed down for March 13 citizen rally
3. Moneybags and mouthpieces

This morning the Democracy Campaign began airing an animated video that parodies the classic 1975 Schoolhouse Rock educational video "I’m Just a Bill" and offers a decidedly more modern take on how a bill becomes a law.

To watch "Statehouse Crock," go here. Then forward it along to friends, neighbors, co-workers and other acquaintances. And share it with your favorite social studies teacher.

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Last week we announced that the People’s Legislature will be holding an "Unfinished Business" rally at the Capitol on Thursday, March 13. Details for this citizen assembly are beginning to take shape. It will start at 11 a.m. and we’ve reserved the GAR Hearing Room (417 North) in the Capitol for the event.

Help us turn out a large crowd that will shine light on legislative leaders’ deliberate efforts to run out the clock on the 2007-2008 session and make the point that state lawmakers have no business adjourning when they have failed to take action on so many problems the public clearly wants solved.

We’re lining up lead advocates on a number of pressing issues that are being stonewalled to speak at the rally. Those issues include protecting the Great Lakes, addressing climate change, promoting public health by banning smoking in public places statewide, and revamping our broken health care system.

Please help us spread the word. And please make every effort to join us on the 13th. If you can’t make it, recruit others to go in your place.

We hope to see you there!

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The candidates for state Supreme Court are in danger of becoming bystanders in their own race as big interest groups and shadowy front organizations duke it out to sway voters in the April 1 election. The Madison newsweekly Isthmus published an article last week that tries to sort out who’s who among those trying to shape our high court in their image.

After April 1, they’ll set their sights on the fall elections that will decide who controls the state Legislature.