The Citizen Brain Vs. the Politician Brain

In this update: 1. Public and politicians far apart on money in politics 2. "60 Minutes" correspondent tells it like it is 3. Documentary film overcomes censorship 4. Stamp out money in politics 5. After nearly four decades in shadows, ALEC in unwelcome limelight The Citizen Brain Vs. the Politician Brain

Email date: 8/14/13

In this update:
1. Public and politicians far apart on money in politics
2. “60 Minutes” correspondent tells it like it is
3. Documentary film overcomes censorship
4. Stamp out money in politics
5. After nearly four decades in shadows, ALEC in unwelcome limelight

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Public and politicians far apart on money in politics
Our latest blog post focuses on how very differently citizens and politicians see the issue of money in politics. The public thinks there's way too much of it, the politicians are convinced there's not enough. The public thinks it should be out in the open, the politicians want to keep it hidden.

The Capital Times published the commentary, first online and then in today's print edition. One of the points it makes is that even national business leaders are increasingly taking a dim view of the way the political money game is being played. A group representing small businesses in Wisconsin recently reinforced that impression.

Our most recent podcast delves deeper into soon-to-be-introduced legislation aimed at making the money in state politics harder to see.

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“60 Minutes” correspondent tells it like it is
Longtime “60 Minutes” correspondent Lesley Stahl sums up our current political system about as well as anyone could, and it will only take you a minute to watch.

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Documentary film overcomes censorship
The producers of the movie “Citizen Koch” lost funding from public television when PBS tried to appease the billionaire subject of the documentary. The filmmakers turned to online “crowdsourcing” to replace the lost funds, and the story has a happy ending.

The Democracy Campaign's director was interviewed extensively for the project and appears numerous times in the film.

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Stamp out money in politics
Now here’s a novel way to send a message about what you think of money's role in our elections and our government.

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After nearly four decades in shadows, ALEC in unwelcome limelight
The American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC, for short) has been around for 40 years, but only became notorious in the last couple of years, largely due to a website called ALEC Exposed.

The outfit that WDC's director recently called “one part corporate-sponsored dating service and one part bill mill” is back in the news. A Madison state representative attended ALEC's conference in Chicago last week and shared her experiences. For more on how ALEC courts state lawmakers, check out the report by the National Institute on Money in State Politics.