Let the People Speak

In this update: 1. 35 citizen groups say let the people speak 2. Does the Supreme Court know what it’s doing? Let the People Speak

Email date: 10/9/13

In this update:
1. 35 citizen groups say let the people speak
2. Does the Supreme Court know what it’s doing?

______________________________________________________________

35 citizen groups say let the people speak
A coalition of close to three dozen groups rallied at the Capitol yesterday to call attention to a new case dealing with money in politics that the U.S. Supreme has taken up and to demand a statewide vote in Wisconsin on the subject. If you weren’t able to attend, you can watch the rally on YouTube (or on our site) and check out some of the newspaper and television coverage of the event.

After the rally, a letter from the Money Out, Voters In coalition was delivered to Assembly Government Operations and State Licensing Committee chairman Tyler August demanding that he schedule a public hearing on Assembly Joint Resolution 50, which authorizes a statewide referendum on whether the U.S. Constitution should be amended to effectively overturn the infamous 2010 Supreme Court ruling in the Citizens United case. If you haven’t already done so, please take a few minutes to contact Representative August (by calling 608-266-1190 or emailing his office at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) to urge him to hold a hearing on AJR 50.

While you are at it, contact your own legislators and let them know you support AJR 50 and want all of the people of Wisconsin to be given an opportunity to have their say on money in politics.

______________________________________________________________

Does the Supreme Court know what it’s doing?
During yesterday’s oral arguments in McCutcheon v. FEC, members of the U.S. Supreme Court made assumptions about the case that the national Center for Responsive Politics described as having a “tenuous connection to reality.” Based on comments made during the oral arguments, the court’s conservative majority seems inclined to overturn decades of legal precedence and strike down a key federal campaign contribution limit. Justice Antonin Scalia led the rhetorical charge, disputing the idea that large political donations can be corrupting, arguing they merely express “gratitude.”

Meanwhile, at the state level here at Wisconsin, lawmakers are pushing for bigger donations and less public disclosure of who’s giving the money. The Wisconsin State Journal editorialized this week against the anti-disclosure legislation.