Hearing Tomorrow on How to Kill a Democracy

In this update: 1. Assembly committee holding hearing on anti-disclosure bill 2. Sand mining power grab knocked off fast track 3. Wisconsin members of Congress relying heavily on PAC donations Hearing Tomorrow on How to Kill a Democracy

Email date: 10/28/13

In this update:
1. Assembly committee holding hearing on anti-disclosure bill
2. Sand mining power grab knocked off fast track
3. Wisconsin members of Congress relying heavily on PAC donations

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Assembly committee holding a hearing on anti-disclosure bill
An Assembly committee is having a public hearing tomorrow morning on proposed legislation that would eliminate the reporting of who employs campaign donors in Wisconsin. This is a companion bill to Senate legislation that received a hearing on October 3, at which the Democracy Campaign testified in opposition.

In a commentary under the headline “How to Kill a Democracy,” Milwaukee journalist Bruce Murphy summed up the proposal’s aim as “ending transparency in campaigns.”

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Sand mining power grab knocked off fast track
Despite determined efforts to make sure as few ears as possible heard the powerful personal stories of western Wisconsin residents worried about the effects of sand mining on everything from their health and peace of mind to their property values and local roads, a few key senators have distanced themselves from the attempt to seize local control over mining operations and the legislation’s author is acknowledging that it will not come up for a vote until at least 2014.

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Wisconsin members of Congress relying heavily on PAC donations
Public approval of Congress has hit rock bottom in the wake of the government shutdown. That hasn’t stopped special interest political action committees from showing them the love. In fact, PACs are about the only place Wisconsin’s congressional delegation can find any signs of approval. And they are every politician’s favorite kind of signs . . . dollar signs.