Clock Keeps Ticking, Justice Keeps Waiting

In this update: 1. Clock keeps ticking, justice keeps waiting in Jensen case 2. Time has come for Supreme Court election reform 3. A dozen essential nutrients for democracy Clock Keeps Ticking, Justice Keeps Waiting 

Email date: 9/29/09

In this update:
1. Clock keeps ticking, justice keeps waiting in Jensen case
2. Time has come for Supreme Court election reform
3. A dozen essential nutrients for democracy

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Clock keeps ticking, justice keeps waiting in Jensen case
Last Friday we posted a clock on our Big Money Blog to keep the time that has passed since former Assembly Speaker Scott Jensen was criminally charged with misconduct in public office for his role in the Capitol caucus scandal. We will keep the clock running until the Jensen case is concluded one way or the other, to serve as an ongoing reminder of the way a prominent political figure is treated in the criminal justice system as opposed to how ordinary citizens fare.

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Time has come for Supreme Court election reform
As a recent editorial in the Oshkosh Northwestern says, the time has arrived for Wisconsin to enact campaign finance reform for Supreme Court elections. Longtime radio news anchor Tim Morrissey posted a blog yesterday providing the latest illustration of how big-money interests are bending justice to serve their purposes. The case he cites pales in comparison to last year’s Menasha Corporation tax case, but it shows a conspicuous pattern emerging in the high court’s rulings.

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A dozen essential nutrients for democracy
In a guest newspaper commentary, Democracy Campaign director Mike McCabe makes the case that American democracy is seriously undernourished and lists 12 staples of a subsistence diet. Ninth on his list is a distribution of wealth sufficient to sustain a middle class. In today’s news there is a report based on U.S. Census figures that gives cause for heightened concern about this aspect of civic malnutrition. In a country where the richest 1% already had more wealth than the bottom 95%, the recession has further widened the gap between rich and poor.